“This Mouth” 10th anniversary remaster: if you just love clean acts, don’t bother buying.

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Music wasn’t that bad in 2008. I mean commercial music. You could turn on the radio or TV and listen to some good things, Timbaland, Kanye West, Nelly Furtado, Lily Allen, Maroon 5, Justin Timberlake, that was fresh air compared to the boring 90’s. Hey, even Oasis started to release something that sounded meaningful in 2008…

And “This Mouth (Nhạc Cho Em Mèo)” from yours truly. Gosh, it’s been 10 years. So the high-powers decided to give it a remaster test. Pass? Fail? Let’s dig deeper.

How does the remaster of “This Mouth (Nhạc Cho Em Mèo)” stand out, compared with the original version?
It’s like listening with HQ loudspeakers after 10 years of earphones, to give you a metaphor. It’s the same album, same sound, but different, enhanced. Like a gramophone with a new stylus.

Why did you choose to remaster “This Mouth (Nhạc Cho Em Mèo)” instead of any other of your records?
I found I still had the original masters, that were actually cruelly lacking mastering, also it’s its 10th anniversary today, and despite its lo-fi sound, it’s a fans’ favourite, so why not cleaning it a little?

Did you remix the songs as well?
Not a slice. The multi tracks have been long deleted and there’s no way to remix the songs, even if my life depended on it. Which is good, since I don’t want to fuck up with history anyway.

Are there any bonus tracks from the “This Mouth (Nhạc Cho Em Mèo)” sessions? Any demo?
No. And no. There’s the original bonus track that you get if you’re a good girl (or good boy) and download the album instead of lazily streaming it. There’s a demo or two somewhere, they might appear someday in a “Rare Grooves” collection album, or not, I don’t know.

What makes “This Mouth (Nhạc Cho Em Mèo)” so special?
There are some powerful energies involved in its making, back in 2008, and you can feel them when you listen to it. It’s a soulful record, it has its own kind of groove. Its dysfunctional for the better, should I say…

What gave it this lo-fi mood?
Some experimentations went bananas.

Is “This Mouth (Nhạc Cho Em Mèo)” a concept-album?
Yes and no, it has a unity for sure, and some underlying stories that connect the songs, so you can say there’s a concept behind it.

Who should never buy “This Mouth (Nhạc Cho Em Mèo)”?
It’s surely not for everyone. It’s quite libidinous, booze-infused, things could go berserk sometimes, so if you just love clean acts, don’t bother buying. It’s like an exclusive club, you need to pass a test, and if you love “This Mouth (Nhạc Cho Em Mèo)” you’re in.


* This Mouth (Nhạc Cho Em Mèo) 10th anniversary remaster *

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Paul J. No is the biggest bastard of Lunear! (featuring interview and quiz)

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In a time they call the 70’s and 80’s, the hype of the hypes (and the pot of gold for record companies) was supergroups. It was the brief union of members from various famous bands, or solo artists joining forces to make promises or at least an album.

Usually, supergroups were one-album wonders, despite their best of intentions. The reason was that you couldn’t expect huge egos to cohabitate in the same studio, dressing room or stage for too long before destructive fights, political matters and lawyers making grey hair defending angry record companies.

You might (or not) remember Paice Ashton & Lord, Captain Beyond, GTR, Asia, The Firm, The Power Station, Arcadia, or more recently Super Heavy. Only a few have survived, although a closer look at their line-ups clearly shows that only one member carries on, surrounded by anonymous underpaid session-musicians.

With the access of technology made easier and cheaper, one-man bands have become the new trend. If it saves from ego-driven fights, being the leader of a one-man band is quite a ‘lonely at the top’ situation, and sadly not even at the top for most of them. So without much surprise, a new kind of supergroup just started to show, which is the union of several one-man bands to form a multi-man band. Isn’t life a cycle, after all?

The first of these new supergroups is the power-trio named Lunear. Sousbock (Sébastien Bournier), Qurtis (JP Benadjer) and Midrone (Paul J. No) may not be as famous as Duran Duran, Genesis or Deep Purple who were a regular basis for supergroups in glorious days, but they’re all three established projects in their own fields.

Not exactly being fresh chicken, they have a common ground, which is a search for some musical perfection, leading to extremely high-quality records. Moreover, their collaboration hasn’t started with Lunear: take Sousbock’s “Lune & l’Autre” in 2009, you’ll hear Paul J. No and JP Benadjer giving a helping hand to Sebastien Bournier’s greatest musical achievement ever (only him could argue about it).

Here the equation is a bit different, since this supergroup is supposed to be, ahem, a democratic unit (don’t laugh please). When you know how rock bands and democracy don’t make very good matches, you may wonder how they could manage not to rip each other to threads. Well, they could and as result, there’s a superb album called “Many Miles Away”.

To give you a hint of the quality the band could reach, let’s say that if 1973 was represented by “The Dark Side Of The Moon” and 1985 by “Brothers In Arms”, 2018 should be the year of “Many Miles Away”. Top quality sound, fabulous songwriting, sophisticated music yet melodically captivating, a huge variety of songs that keep a unity all through the 50 minutes of the album, well, it doesn’t get better than this!

There’s a natural flow, constant inspiration, there is something that happens each and every second, each and every note carries its load of wonders, there’s actually not a single weakness, not a hint of dullness, nothing that comes in the way. “Many Miles Away” is close to what we’d expect from a perfect album. This is high-class sophisticated rock, the songs that Muse tries but in vain to write since their debuts.

Although the Lunear lads don’t try to hide their influences, the music never sounds like pastiche or a tribute. Sure one can spot a glimpse of this, a spoonful of that, yet it never spoils anything more than it should. Everyone will find a link with their favourite music anyway, so it’s rather pointless to analyse furthermore.

On the flip side, the lyrics rather fail to excite me. Knowing how a great gifted lyricist Bournier is with Soubock, I expected more than this mundane 40-something existential concerns, that will touch the heart of 40-something rat-racers in quest of life’s questions. “Slam the door, hit the road, leave everything behind, change your life (…) Time to follow your heart”. Come on, guys, really???

To understand a bit more about Lunear’s democratic structure, Seb, JP and Paul kindly answered a few mildly disturbing questions.

– Compared with Sousbock, which is your approach in songwriting with Lunear?

Seb: Well, it’s really not the same thing because in Sousbock I’m responsible for everything. I’ve had some collaboration within Sousbock that went the same way as for Lunear: I wrote lyrics and someone sent a music back. That was mainly the case with Lunear. I had lyrics and Paul would send songs back. Sometimes I had lyrics and musical ideas. Paul had musical ideas too. Almost finished songs but with no lyrics nor guide vocals and I just had to sing my lyrics over the music. That is a really fun way to write. And a bit worrying too because you hope that the others will like what you did. I can say that lyrics came first for Lunear. Or that existing lyrics were paired with existing musics. But I didn’t write lyrics for a specific music. In Sousbock there were no rules. Lyrics or Music, or sometimes both at the same time while writing and improvising…

Paul: I know that It’s a question for Seb, but I’d like to add that Seb’s lyrics fits perfectly with our kind of moods and music. As a singer I had no problem to sing them, and as a composer, they were very inspiring.

– Do you think that it’s easier to collaborate with other musicians since you have your own projects (Sousbock, Esse) to ease your ego?

Seb: I don’t know. But it is *really* a good thing to forget your ego and work to achieve something that will please three people instead of one. It’s really good to say things like « ok I’d really love to sing this one but your voice is better for the song, so do it ». And Paul has an amazing voice, that’s why he is our lead singer! At the end the music is the winner. It’s all for the music. It’s all that matters. And I think, because of that, it’s the best album I’ve been involved with and it’s no coincidence that I’m so proud of it.

– JP joined the band later. Did you and Paul start the project as Lunear, or were you thinking of a new Midrone album, or even a Sousbock record? Or did you start from a blank page?

Seb: One day, after working on each other projects for many years we just said « hey, let’s make an album together! ». We didn’t start from a blank page. We had lots of unused musical ideas, lyrics and even almost finished songs that we thought could fit in well. But we wanted to make a new band. So that was not Midrone and that was not Sousbock either.

JP: Sousdrone.

Seb: Or Mibock 😉

Paul: Midbock could be a fine name ;-)) What I feel great about those songs is that I really believe that none of us would have been able to do such an album without the help of the others. Even JP who arrived late in the process laid his magical touch on all the songs. A song like “Fresh Start”, which was the first we wrote with Seb, gained a lot after JP’s input.

– JP, Paul and you have worked together on several projects, including Sousbock. It seems that you are three ingredients than can produce different recipes. Do you feel there are more possibilities for you 3 working together on different kinds of projects, or have you already reached the limits of your collaborations?

Seb: Time is the limit. Really. And Money. And Distance. Otherwise, I’m up for anything music wise.

JP: As Prince said: « Time is a trick ». And don’t forget that the spice has mutated over four thousand years, we can use the orange spice gas which gives us the ability to fold space. That is, travel to any part of the universe without moving.

Paul: You can see that JP is a Dune fan 😉

– Knowing that most of influences came from you and Paul, if a second album has to be released, do you think that JP will bring his own set of influences, which include some more funky stuff? He’s known to be a huge admirer of Prince and David Bowie.

Seb: A second album will be released! That’s a scoop for you! I’ve already written the lyrics for 9 new songs and we’re really excited about it! Now we’ll have to write the music. And it will be new because now JP will be here from the beginning. I don’t think he will propose funky stuff to us, because I don’t like that and I think that our goal is to please the other two guys in the band. We’re not going full Tony Banks on the other two and forcing them to play and record things they don’t enjoy 😉

JP: And I love funky stuff but I can’t write some things like that. I never wrote any funky song… Maybe one title for PolarSun had a little funky taste (“Michael Collins”), but that’s all.

Paul: I’d love to do some funky music!! Sing in falsetto!! But let’s face it, it’s not the style of music we can produce in Lunear. When we finished the album, there was kind of a private joke. Seb saying that after the release he will leave the band, but JP and me always saying we’d love to try to do another one, with or without Seb… I guess he wrote the lyrics that fast just in case ;-))

– Amongst you three, who’s the biggest bastard?

Seb: That would be Paul, obviously 😉

JP: The idiot bastard song…. it would be a great song title. Oh wait !

Seb: Marillion has this song: “Built-in Bastard Radar”. I think we need one!

Paul: I don’t like that Marillion song… I’m definitely the bastard. I’d love to be the bad guy like in all good movies…

– Is it a rumour that Paul J No asked a plastic surgeon to make him look like Jon Bon Jovi?

Seb: Can we agree that when it’s true it’s not a rumour?

Paul: Plastic Surgeon??? Gosh… I’d love to be like Jon Bon Jovi at his age… Even if that’s not my cup of coffee.

– JP is obviously very strict about production and quality. When he joined the project, did he feel he had to fix a lot, or was he pleased by what he already heard?

JP: There are some re-takes, but it was overall pretty good when I arrived. I hope we will reach another level on the next album, including in the recording phase.

Seb: Well… He had to record all guitars and bass because on the demos they were played on a keyboard with guitar and bass sounds. That was a big thing to fix.

Paul: I have to admit that every guitar and bass that JP recorded was far stronger than the ones I recorded on the demos. JP is impressive. His work on the mix of the album is just brilliant. Sound is neat, clear. Powerful. I hope that with number 2 we’ll be able to maintain that level. I learned a lot from him and I’m sure we’ll reach a higher step on our next record.

– Does it make sense that Paul J No is a fan of Yes?

JP: Definitely maybe

Seb: You were keeping your best situation, an answer to yes. And don’t forget that the yes needs the no to win against the no.

Paul: The problem is that not only I’m a huge fan of Yes. The main issue is that my favorite Yes is the YesWest with Trevor Rabin.

– The songwriting on Lunear is impressive. Would you consider writing songs for other people, as a team?

Seb: Why are you asking? Do you need songs for your next Snowcat album? Seriously, I love to collaborate with others but I don’t know if I can write for others. Writing is not that hard but it takes time and energy. We don’t have enough time and energy for our own projects so…

JP: I dream about making film music.

Paul: I’d love writing for other artists. With or without my mates of Lunear. I don’t have enough ego to be a strong frontman. I’d better be a man in the shadows. I would have loved to see my songs sung by great singers…

– Why those Spanish people need to write question marks the reverse way? Was it easy to talk with Paul, who now lives there?

Seb: ¡ No ! Or… is it « ¡ Yes ! » ???¿¿¿??? Is it ?¿?

BONUS: as if wasn’t enough, why don’t you take the Lunear quiz right now?

What the ‘J’ of Paul J. No stands for?

  1. Jamon
  2. Jamón
  3. Jamòn
  4. Jamôn
  5. Jovi (from Jón Bón Jóvi)
  6. ¡?¿! (from Museo Del ¡?¿!)
  7. All of the above
  8. None of the above, or maybe one or two (from Museo Del Above)
  9. All of the below
  10. Jenesis
  11. Jene Simmons (from Jene Loves Gezebel)
  12. As above, so below
  13. Find here

Lunear on the web: http://lunearmusic.com/

 

Lunear: the birth of a band (part 1)

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Sébastien Bournier, singing drummer and drumming singer

Sébastien Bournier, the singing drummer, had a dream. A strong, obsessive dream. He wanted to take group pictures. Stupid group pictures. With a pose. Like any decent 80’s hair-metal band.

Satan Jokers

Years passed and someday, suddenly, he took the plunge, called his good friend J-P Benadjer, gave him a camera, and said: “Come on, JP, take group pictures of me”.

JP took the pics, gave back the camera to Seb, who went to the photographer having the film developed.

J-P Benadjer, fractal photographer

When he came back home, he called JP, panicked: “JP, I think there’s a little problem with the pics”

“Yeah?” said JP.

“I’m alone.”

“So?”

“Well, these are group pics”.

“Ah, true. Never thought of that”

“What should I do?”

“Get a friend, bring him her and I’ll take more pictures.”

“JP, you’re a genius.”

“I know.”

Seb took his old but strong 1982 Citroën LNA and hit the road to Spain, where his old pal Paul J. No was making a living as a more or less official Jon Bon Jovi doppelganger. His hard earned pay check was however dilapidated in satisfying his deeper vice, drinking jamón soup till he dropped, every night, in his favourite Museo del Jamón restaurant.

Seb found Paul sniffing his 45th spoonful of jamón fat and boldly asked him if he wanted to join for group pictures. No said yes.

The two friends hit the road again, PJN having to deal with Seb’s recurrent joke: “Why didn’t you study medicine? You could have become Dr No!” Paul never knew if he had to laugh, sigh or simply keep quiet. He opted to laugh, which happened to be the wrong choice that just made Seb very confident in his storytelling, and remember the road is long. Many, many miles…

Paul J. No, affirmative serial jamónizer

Back to France, JP was asked once again to shoot what became a duet. “Lovely, lovely”, he said after the 457th cliché taken, “you look like a modern version of Modern Talking. Doubly modern.”.

“No”, said Seb.

“You called me?” said No.

“No, No, I meant I don’t want to look like Modern Talking”.

Modern Talking

“Me neither”, said No.

“You need to be three”, JP revealed.

“…or no to be!” laughed No, who revealed the source of his musical guilty pleasure.

“On s’est promis, oh oui, d’être toujours des amis ! ”, gladly added JP.

“I don’t want to be mistaken for the 2B3”, cried Seb.

2 Be 3

“Don’t worry”, said JP, “the risk is, let’s say, quite low.”

“So let’s bring Snowcat on the group.”

“No”, said No.

“I don’t want to take pictures of Snowcat”, mumbled JP.

“And I don’t want Snowcat on the pics!”, added Seb.

“So why you asked?”, wondered No and JP.

“Hey, we need someone here, no?”, defended Seb.

“You called me, Seb?”, asked No.

“No.”

“Yes, you just did it again.”

“Oops”, britneyspeared Seb.

“What if JP became the 3rd member of our group?”, suggested No.

“Yes but who will take the pictures then?”, asked Seb.

“We can call Snowcat…”, innocently offered JP.

“Or simply use the timer of my iPhone X and do the shooting that way”, completed Seb.

A band was born. And then there were 3.

The pictures went viral. In no time, Seb, JP & No had become the new idols of South France, Spain and Catalognia del Jamón. Girls were sleeping in front of the house, money was flowing, life was good.

JP expressed his happiness: “We have a great band, wonderful pictures, faithful fans, free cocktails and a swimming pool. What else do we need?”

“An album, maybe?” replied No. “We haven’t played a single note of music since we formed.”

“Oh, that’s a great idea”, complimented Seb. “I’ll be the drummer. And you both, what you want to be?”

JP admitted that bass would suit him well, and No chose the keyboards.

“We need a guitarist”, reminded Seb.

“I know a band that became a trio and it’s the bassist who played the guitar”, said No.

“Well, he tried”, thought a realistic JP.

(Some bass players should have remained bass players)

Once it had been decided that it’s JP who would play the guitar, our newly formed band locked itself in a studio for four years, called themselves Lunear and offered the world their first album, a long-playing called “Many Miles Away”.

Listen to the album here: http://lunearmusic.com/listen/

Visit the website to get to know the three lads: http://lunearmusic.com/

What is the strange relationship between Lunear, Sousbock, Qurtis and Midrone? Read the review in this blog very soon (once it’s written actually).

 

 

 

 

 

“Don’t go there!”, they told me (Wild, dangerous & fun)

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If you’re familiar with Tarzan-style old movies, you most likely have heard the porters who said, paralysed by fear: “Don’t go there, sir! There very very dangerous, sir!“. But the ‘sir’ doesn’t seem to give a damn about the wise advice from the men of the Jungle, and keeps on going straight ahead. Then they leave the trunks on the floor, shout a desperate “We don’t go there sir“, run away, yelling a last piece of wisdom sounding like “We warned you, sir. We warned you!“.

Similarly, the taxi driver who doesn’t want to lift his customer to the deep dark parts of Brooklyn at night is fitting the same category.

But it’s only a movie, isn’t it? Does it happen in reality?

Hell yeah it does. When Gilles Snowcat gathered his musicians to give them a hint about his forthcoming album he had in mind, the reaction was unanimous: “Don’t go there, Snowcat!

Don’t go there, Gilles, this is dangerous music! No one does that anymore. Those who tried never came back. And those who succeeded failed anyway. Why don’t you play safe?“.

Far from daunting the Mardi Gras-born feline, the naysaying demands from the network boosted him to not only try, but succeed into making the wild, dangerous and fun territories his.

That’s why, since 18th of April, 2018, Snowcat is exploring, creating, experimenting and pushing his own boundaries to the point of no-return. And it’s quite exciting. Wild, dangerous, fun and exciting.

And guess what? The naughty musicians who were so reluctant to take the trip, where are they now? With Gilles, on the very same boat. Excited like kids in a toys store.

Yes there are sharks, traps, toxic stuff and tempting sirens carrying bottles of forbidden liquors, but so what? Isn’t it what makes rock’n’roll the upper it should always be?

Will we keep you updated on the making-of the album? Will we send you lots of pictures? Probably not. What happens backstage remains backstage. When time will come for you to discover the new collection of Snowcat’s tunes, you’ll know it without even realise. And you’ll feel in a wild, dangerous and fun mood.

The Night Cats.

Massage is all about connection. Music too.

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Going to get a massage is often a wonderful experience. It can be thanks to the technique of the masseuse, or simply the level of connection she puts in her work.

The atmosphere of the salon also plays a big role in the quality of the massage. And the music.

Massage music is almost always quiet, light and slow. Gentle acoustic guitar or piano, with sounds of nature in the background. It helps to set the mood, and to keep it.

However, to stick with those characteristic can be counterproductive. You sometimes feel that the music is, if not like an intruder, at least like it wasn’t really part of the massage.

I wanted to understand how a good, efficient massage music could work. How to make it part of it, not just an addition.

Talking to massage salon owners and workers, I realised they all agreed that the music was either too random, or too cliché, too esotheric. They supported me in creating something they could use to improve the massage for the patient. And also for themselves. After all, isn’t massage a shared experience between the masseuse and the client?

Trance Awaken Massage

After a few trial and error steps, and a test in salons, the first two pieces of Nekokawa Massage were born. Honey Drops Massage is dedicated to full-body massages, especially Chinese ones, when Trance Awake Massage looks more on the Thai, or tantric side of the experience.

The positive reactions show that Nekokawa Massage is on the right track. Therefore, welcome www.nekokawamassage.com!

You can listen for free as a trial, then buy your HQ version for your salon.

Honey Drops Massage

Share your experiences and sensations with me too! Even better music will come from it…

G.S.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Trance Awaken Massage

The art of being elegantly caught in the act

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It’s November of 2017 and the brand new release “Bareta!” breaks new grounds for Gilles Snowcat.

Two new studio songs, the pulsing “Bareta!” and the sensually naughty “Eleganto Ni“, are completed by an unplugged live version of “Three Kinds Of Milk“, taken from the sessions of “Nama Time!

“Bareta!” depicts the breathtaking life of that anonymous couple in a constant need for excitement. It’s a wanton peek into the hectic life of their escape. Between adrenalin shots, expensive restaurants and cheap fast-food places, love and fear, the lovers seize every second, every minute, every hour of the day and the night.

A stunning sunset, a starry night, a cloudy sunrise, fresh air or hot breeze, there’s nothing that they can’t enjoy. There is elegance in their parallel life, elegance in messy their hotel room, elegance in their morning goosebump.

Everthing is elegant. Being caught in the act is still elegant. The casino just opened, which means that with Gilles’ love songs after dark, everyone is a winner.

“Bareta!” in shops: http://its-oh.net/index.php/directory/category/bareta-store-direct

“Bareta!”, the booklet: http://www.its-oh.net/ebook/bareta-booklet/mobile/index.html

 

Snowcat Sountrack [music for your videos, short films, movies, conferences, events, video games, CM or private bedroom time]

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Well you know there’s something hot planned for 15th of November? I’m not talking about it now. There’s something else. Snowcat Soundtrack is a collection of pieces that you can use for various purposes like videos, short films, movies, conferences, events, video games, CM or private bedroom time.

Feel free to cut, copy, paste, remix… as long as you credit the composer. It’s on download offer in Bandcamp. Choose the piece you need following your purpose, or buy the whole album (which implies a good discount).

01. Snowball Maps  04:26
02. Almost Wet  09:51
03. Don’t Forget The Volcano  02:18
04. Erocket  02:56
05. In Between Before And After Voodoo  05:27

06. The Best Pick Up Line Ever  03:03
07. Act Of Denegation  04:10
08. Derrick Straße  03:52
09. Memo Micro  01:36
10. Good Time Cream  02:50

The Rock Star Paradox: Gilles’ first eBook is…

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… a call to action. The definite eBook for musicians. Available on Kindle here. Or on PDF here. So what? Why should you read The Rock Star Paradox? Who is The Rock Star Paradox for?

The Rock Star Paradox is for you if:

You are a musician and want to take your career to the next level. You know there’s more in life than just playing music, but you don’t know what. Something resonates with you, still you’re clueless. The Rock Star Paradox will open up your eyes and mind to what you didn’t even imagine could exist. You’ll be artistically and mentally bigger, taller and stronger after discovering

You are tired of writing the great songs in your band and see that the girls sleep with the illiterate lead singer. You do the hard work but the reward goes to someone else and you feel it’s unfair. You haven’t assessed your persona yet, and you feel like shit in your own band. Time to switch from insecure musician to confident rock star and show the world who you are and what your work is. The Rock Star Paradox will teach you how to get the credit you deserve.

You play in a cover band, or worse in a tribute band – and you hate it. It’s hard to leave the comfort of your band when you’re scared of the rock star journey? You couldn’t find any better book than The Rock Star Paradox. You’ll understand why tribute / cover bands have nothing to do with rock’n’roll and why staying with them will ruin your rock star career.

You are stuck, paralysed by the paradoxes because you think they are evil. They’re not evil. You have to make them work for you, not against you. This book will not only open your eyes to the actual paradoxes, but also teach you how to use them at your own advantage to the point that you’ll wish there could be more of them in life.

https://sellfy.com/embed/store/full/RockStarParadox

You want fucking money but you don’t feel like working for a fast-food chain or staying in a cubicle listening to lousy jokes from boring colleagues. You’ll learn how to link art and money without feeling like a betrayer. You’ll discover why money is actually your music’s best friend.

You’re curious. You want to understand what the hell happens in rock stars’ mind. Why are they different from the average person? What psychology drives them, what makes them what they are? Everything is explained here in The Rock Star Paradox.

You have a day job. And you wonder how if it’s good or bad for your musical career. The Rock Star Paradox will teach you how to make your job work for your rock star status instead of killing it.

You’re surrounded by unsupportive people. Your family, spouse and friends want you to have a “serious” activity and do their best to destroy your rock star ambitions? But you love them and don’t want to dump them. The Rock Star Paradox has a powerful solution for you. And it will benefit your circle too. Win-win!

You love the author of the book. That’s also a good reason.

You’ve read tons of books on music business. And you haven’t made any realistic move since 15 years. The Rock Star Paradox is not just words, it’s a call to action.

So? It’s here.

 

90% to kill procrastination? You bet it works.

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Dear friends,

summer is preparing to leave space for the ever inspiring month of September. You may be pissed at saying goodbye to your beloved farniente season. That’s why I decided to do something crazy for you. My cute discography on Bandcamp (30 releases) for a mere 10 bucks instead of 106. (??!!)

No need to be a math genius to get it’s 90% off. (!!!!)

Fuck, 90%????

But Gilles, how long will you survive with such a low price?

No idea. That’s precisely why the discount will last until I can’t take it no more.

Understand: I start it today and may remove it tomorrow, or in 2 weeks, or next year, or never, or in October, whatever… You’re not quick enough? You miss it. But how quick is quick enough? It’s just like life itself: you receive every day an amount of time that can be taken back at any moment. It can be within an hour, or in 20 years. It’s life’s greatest uncertainty.

So for fuck’s sake, my discount is not just a discount, it’s an anti-procrastination kick in you ass. Usually, people wait for the last moment of the discount to enjoy it. “Tomorrow’s still OK, why should I buy it now?“, you said. Now you can’t anymore!!! You’d better jump on my Bandcamp page and get that whole discography. Click on any album and then choose “Full digital discography“.

Now I’m getting back to my work of writing my eBook while you enjoy my humble discography. Did I say… “my eBook”?

Oh oh… keep connected. I smell there’s something you will like then…
Thank you for you faithfulness, patience and checks. 🙂

G.S.

Here comes Mr Realtapes, or Brick Bosso exposed. Brilliantly.

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I didn’t want to start this review with the same old moans about how great music was in the past and how boring it is now. But I will. I love being an old fart. In the evolution of rock, let’s say from “Rock Around The Clock” until now, there has been some periods, clear evolutions and devolutions that led us to what the music market is now: music either impersonating past eras on an embarrassing parody, either bland and unbearably safe. Live venues are polluted by cover bands and audiences are fooled to the point of thinking that Muse is really a rock band. Where are the melodies?

Brick Bosso stole them.

Most known for his huge knowledge on synthesizers and his flair to discover unique artists all over the world, Brick Bosso somehow decided, maybe without even knowing it, to become the most British act from California.

The press release is as short as it can be, stating that “Equipped with only a minimalist studio and guitars, tons of talent, and his curse-breaking tenacity, Brick Bosso finally releases his debut album.

When asked to clarify the issue of the music style he’s conveying, Bosso keeps it vague: “I’m happy to tell some stories in songs– stories that I might not have had a chance to articulate if I hadn’t picked up my guitar.”

Stories. “Dark Exposure” is all about stories, articulated words matching their melody that could almost rank Bosso in the crooner box. “I think the thing I value most about writing songs is the ability to tell stories and present views of things that are unusual or awkward to express in everyday life.”

On the short 35 minutes spread into 12 songs (two being download bonuses), Brick Bosso shows a talent that may hide a devouring ambition to conquer a niche and crush other musicians. But always unassuming, he humbly states that “Ideally the album will get just enough attention to attract a few musicians so I can assemble a team, kind of like the way The Avengers or The Justice League were assembled, only on a much, much smaller budget, and even louder.”

Dark Exposure” has what a good album needs: an unity and enough variety to keep the listener satisfied, from the first notes of the sunny beach anthem “Watching The Sun Come Up” to the last beat of the acoustic-driven “Strange Transcendent Mary”, making Mary rhyme with Hello Kitty under a comfy blanket of Mellotron strings.

I told before that Bosso had a soft spot for analog machines, yet the synthesizers are strangely low-key in the record. They make an apparition here and there, but besides the New Order infused “The Day And The Night” and its dissonant guitars fighting with an uncontrollable synth-bass, they mostly leave space for a dominative Farfisa organ, sometimes 60s on steroids, sometimes even punk (“Was”). The organ leaves its comfort zone to do the perfect match with new-wave guitars on the fascinating “Flow With It”, or sympathises with an almost industrial drum machine on “True Believer”.

The 60’s feel comes here and there, especially with “Mary On My Mind” that sounds McCartney-ish even before hearing some of the confirming lyrics.

The obvious single that could smash the radios is the infectious “Here Comes Mr. Faketapes”, that asks for explanation, such a title being obviously anything but innocent. Brick Bosso provides it when asked about the future of his promising musical career. Brick Bosso came on album as unexpectedly as he might withdraw, since he’s not a heavy planner and when asked if he could release something new sometimes near, he smiles and shrugs:

Well, now that I’ve called out the false claimants (Find Your Heart Again), criticized the tape fabricators (Here Comes Mr. Faketapes) and addressed Marian apparitions (Strange Transcendent Mary), there’s not much more for me to do, other than sit back and play my ukulele.

Seeing that his statement was hard to believe from such a creative man, he slightly corrects: “I’m tinkering with some other songs, but as far as making “dark exposure” suddenly obsolete by creating a follow up, I’m not ready for that yet.”

Really? Can this be true. Bosso looks irritated and, as if he wanted to please us just to get rid of annoying questions, he closes the interview by dropping “I really don’t know what’s next. I’m writing some more in a more classic rock and blues vein, this time mostly using piano. We’ll see.

Yes we’ll see. And in waiting, let’s keep on hearing and listening to the “Dark Exposure” album from someone who’ll get to be known, despite himself, maybe.

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Brick Bosso, “Dark Exposure”, 2017.

Available at https://brickbosso.bandcamp.com/

Album purchase includes two bonus tracks, “Conversations (We Might Have Had)” and “Waiting For The Paradox”.